Teaching & Learning

What Has Become of You

Academic settings… disturbed and/or disturbing people… why do I keep reading such novels? Well, we know why the academic settings appeal to me. As for the characters, that’s harder to analyze. I suppose I’d like to understand some of the… Read More ›

Loner

Take a look: he’s a nerdy Jewish kid from New Jersey, known as a “nice guy,” intellectually passionate but awkward in social situations. He’s starting his first day as a Harvard freshmen. How could I resist this 2016 novel by… Read More ›

Painting a Mural

A group of dedicated high-school students and city employees paint a mural, in historically accurate colors, overlooking the garden maintained by community volunteers at Clementine Park in Dorchester:

Stories and courses

What is a course? Is it a collection of chapters? Is it a collection of topics? I hope it’s neither — especially not that collection of chapters! A course should always tell a story. It should have a unifying purpose…. Read More ›

Stories and tests

Should a math test tell a story? That’s certainly not what most people think a math test should do! Should a course tell a story? More on that tomorrow, but at least I might get a few more takers for… Read More ›

Weston alum on treating depression

One of my former Weston students has just published “Treating depression takes much more than serotonin,” a fascinating article in Popular Science. The author, Grace Huckins, class of 2012 and erstwhile co-captain of the award-winning Weston High School Math Team, has written this… Read More ›

Teacher comments by race of student

Hmmm… Math teacher Bowman Dickson has gathered some statistics on the frequencies of various words used by teachers of various subjects in their report-card comments on high-school students. Here’s one of his charts: The phrase “more common” in the data above… Read More ›